CofC Logo

The College Colloquium 2015-2016

Welcome to our fourth College Colloquium program.  Several years ago, groups of faculty and staff across campus read Academically Adrift by Richard Arum and Josipa Roska. After reading the book we met in small groups to discuss the content of the book and its connection to our experiences at the College of Charleston.  Last year we had lively discussions of The Innovative Univesity: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out, How College Works, and Cheating Lessons:  Learning From Academic Dishonesty.  The theme for this year's College Colloquium is "The Forces that Surround Us."  and we are kicking of the program reading How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success. Additional Discussion sessions were held in Spring 2016.

Book 1: How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success

How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success by Julie Lythcott-Haims

While ostensibly targeted at parents, How to Raise an Adult is, at its heart, a discussion of the forces that are at work on our students both before they arrive, and during their time at the college. If you’ve ever wondered what our students are thinking, what drives them, what they fear, what they hope for, and most importantly, how the world has asked them to channel these emotions, How to Raise an Adult offers a jumping off point to discuss the role of education and educators in putting students on a path to a future of health and well-being.

The book takes a complicated look at some of the popular narratives of contemporary childrearing (i.e., helicopter parenting), and builds a framework for how we consider intellectual, emotional, and even spiritual growth of this generation of young people.  Lythcott-Haims helps illuminate the experiences and attitudes that have shaped student attitudes toward their own educations. Everyone involved in the lives of these young people wants them to become “successful,” but Lythcott-Haims asks us to consider what this success should look like, and challenges some of these dominant narratives surrounding our widely held cultural definitions of success.

Reading Dates: Monday, October 19th  -  Monday, November 16th.
Discussion Dates: Monday, November 16th - November 30th.

Social Media